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  • Telemedicine is the act of practicing medicine from a distance and your appointment will be conducted by a licensed veterinarian. Before your appointment, gather information on your pet’s history and your current concern. Look at a calendar and write down a timeline of your pet’s problems. Be prepared to answer questions that you would normally be asked at an in-person appointment. Write notes to help you remember everything. Most telemedicine appointments involve the use of some type of video chat. Conduct your visit in a quiet area with good lighting and have your pet with you before the call starts. Not all concerns can be addressed through telemedicine. If your veterinarian is unable to arrive at a diagnosis via telemedicine, he or she can help you determine the next step for your pet to ensure that he or she receives optimal care.

  • Having your pet properly prepared for a blood test helps to ensure that the results are as accurate and reliable as possible. Preparation for these two types of tests is slightly different. Your veterinarian will give you specific instructions before your appointment. It is important that you follow these instructions exactly to ensure accurate test results.

  • Pyrantel pamoate is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat intestinal parasites in many species. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include stomach upset, such as vomiting or diarrhea. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinarian.

  • Ronidazole is given by mouth and is used off label to treat Tritrichomonas foetus, trichomonas, and giardia in dogs, cats, and birds. It should not be used in farmed animals. Common side effects include vomiting and decreased appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other nitroimidazoles such as metronidazole. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Sulfadiazine/trimethoprim is given by mouth in the form of a liquid suspension or is given by injection in the hospital, and it is commonly used to treat bacterial and parasitic infections, sometimes off label, in dogs, cats, small mammals and other exotics. Common side effects include a decreased appetite, vomiting, and diarrhea, although more serious side effects are possible such as dry eye, or liver, blood, or urinary problems. Do not use in pets that have severe liver damage, blood cell problems, dehydration, or sulfa allergies. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim is given by mouth in the form of a liquid suspension or is given by injection in the hospital, and it is commonly used to treat bacterial and parasitic infections, sometimes off label, in dogs, cats, small mammals, and other exotics. Common side effects include a decreased appetite, vomiting, and diarrhea, although more serious side effects are possible such as dry eye, or liver, blood, or urinary problems. Do not use in pets that have severe liver damage, blood cell problems, dehydration, or sulfa allergies. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • When leaving home for vacations, pet owners are confronted with the problem of what to do with their pets. Should they take them along or leave them at home? Reviewing a summary of boarding options and travel guidelines will make the decision easier while safe guarding the well-being of your pet and providing your own peace of mind.

  • Telehealth is a broad term that refers to the use of telecommunications to provide health-related services. Telehealth services can be delivered by a variety of methods including telephone, text messaging, internet chat, and videoconferencing. Teletriage is the act of performing triage remotely, via telephone or internet and helps determine the urgency of your pet’s medical concern. Telemedicine refers to the practice of medicine at a distance. In the context of veterinary medicine, telemedicine refers to a veterinarian formulating a diagnosis and treatment plan for your pet without an in-person examination. Telemedicine is typically only permitted within the context of an existing Veterinarian-Client-Patient Relationship. Given the current COVID-19 pandemic and social/physical distancing requirements however, some federal and local governments have relaxed the requirements surrounding telemedicine.

  • Telemedicine is defined as the act of practicing medicine at a distance. Telemedicine can be offered in a number of different ways: telephone calls, text messaging, online chat, email consultations, and visits conducted through videoconferencing programs. Telemedicine is not appropriate for every concern, such as a pet hit by a car; however, a number of common veterinary complaints can be addressed via telemedicine (e.g., flea allergies, minor limping, mild diarrhea). While it is impossible to perform a complete, comprehensive exam during a telemedicine appointment, in many cases your veterinarian can gather enough information to arrive at a reasonable diagnosis and start treatment. If your veterinarian determines that your pet requires in-person care, your veterinarian can help you determine when and where your pet should be seen and may be able to give you an idea of what to expect during the in-person veterinary visit.

  • Tetracycline is given by mouth and is used off label to treat bacterial infections and inflammatory skin conditions in many animal species. The most common side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other tetracycline antibiotics, or in pregnant animals, especially in the first half of pregnancy. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.